Tips & Tricks occuring to Windows NT / 201 -

 

Overview
This is a summary of Tips occuring to the Topic Windows - NT Server and Windows - NT Workstation. All Tips coming in this week
we marked with the sign

Access to the registry tools has been stopped, is there any way to get access?
Activating Windows XP from the command line
Activating Windows XP during an unattended installation
Active Directory Client Extensions for Windows 95, Windows 98 and Windows NT 4.0 Workstation
ADD DOMAINS TO YOUR BROWSE LIST
Adding a printer to the send to context option?
Adding TCP/IP Security to your Windows NT server
Additing a shortcut to Send To menu
Adding shortcuts to your Network Neighborhood folder in Windows NT
ADJUST EVENT LOG SETTINGS REMOTELY
ADJUSTING THE SCREEN SAVER PASSWORD GRACE PERIOD
Application compatibility Tool
AUTOMATE REMOTE ACCESS DIALING WITH RASDIAL
Automatically search knowledge Base articles from IE
Backing up the Microsoft IIS metabase in Windows 2000 and later
Boot problems with Win2K
Cancelling a domain controller demotion
Changing CursorBlinkRate
Changing default installation path for applications
Changing default path for wallpaper images
Changing directory paths in Windows NT
Changing Internet Explorer windows title
Changing pagefile size within the registry
Change ServicePack Source Path
Changing registry values from the command line
Changing the default background color in Windows NT
Changing the graphic displayed behind the Logon dialog box
Changing the system date and time on a remote server
Choosing a BDC to authenticate to
Choosing the correct items to monitor in Performance Monitor
CLEARING SAVED PASSWORDS/FORM INFORMATION FROM WITHIN INTERNET EXPLORER
Company logo as screen saver object
Compacting the DHCP database in Windows NT
Configuring MS IE 5.0 and later to connect to URLs that contain foreign (multibyte) characters
Confirming how many processors my version of Windows supports
CONFLICTING CREDENTIALS
Configuring file replication between Windows NT and Windows 2000 servers
Configuring the system to let users change their passwords without logging on to the domain
CONNECT USB PERIPHERALS TO YOUR NT 4.0 SYSTEM
Connecting to a non-standard ftp port through ftp
CONTROLLING FONT SIZE ON WEB PAGES
CONTROLLING RESPONSE TO A WINS REQUEST ON A MULTIHOMED MACHINE
Controlling your print jobs from the command line
CONVERTING LICENSES FROM PER SERVER TO PER SEAT
Copying a GPO from one domain to another
CREATE RIGHT-CLICK OPTION TO OPEN COMMAND PROMPT WINDOW
Creating a bootable Windows 2000 CD-ROM with a service pack slipstreamed
Creating an account for the Replication service
Creating an incoming connection in Windows 2000
Creating an MS-DOS network boot disk in Windows 2000
Creating a file containing your user and group accounts in Windows NT
Creating a shortcut that includes a space character
Creating user templates
Customizing the MMC in Windows NT
Deleting Control Panel icons
Deleting entries from AutoComplete
Deny Accessing to the Local Administrator on Windows 2000
Detecting hackers on your network
Determining if you have administrative rights
Determining if your hard disk is fast enough
DEVICE MANAGER DOES NOT DISPLAY ALL CURRENTLY INSTALLED DEVICES?
DFS in Windows NT 4
Diagnosing batch files which are execute under the Schedule service
DISABLE AUTOMATIC PRIVATE IP ADDRESSING IN WINDOWS 2000
DISABLE SOURCE ROUTING ON WINDOWS NT
DISABLE THE GETTING STARTED SCREEN
Disabling Error reporting feature in Windows XP
Disabling NTFS tracking of broken shortcuts
Disabling locally cached profiles
Disabling logon caching in Windows NT
Disabling screen saver during defragmentation
Disabling a Reoccurring Prompt While Trying to Open a .tif File
DISABLING THE BRIEFCASE ICON
Disabling the Show Files dialog box for system folders
DISABLING THE WINDOWS LOGO KEY
DISABLING VIDEO TEST AT SYSTEM RESTART
DISPLAY LEGAL NOTICES AT LOGON
Double click area, how to extend it
DR. WATSON AND THE PRINT SPOOLER
DRAG THE MY COMPUTER ICON FROM DESKTOP TO START MENU
ENABLING BLIND CARBON COPY IN WIN2K PRO
Enabling clear type on the Welcome screen of Windows XP
Enabling compatibility mode with Windows 2000 Service Pack 2 and later
Enabling or disabling the quick launch icons
ENABLING SAVING ATTACHMENTS IN OUTLOOK EXPRESS 6.0
Enabling strong passwords in Windows NT
Enabling Windows Installer Logging
ENFORCING USE OF MANDATORY PROFILES
FILENAME COMPLETION FOR DOS WINDOW
FIX AUTO PLAY
FREE SUPPORT TOOLS ON THE WIN2K CD-ROM
Freeing stuck print jobs on shared printers in Windows NT
Getting ANSI support on the command line
Getting error message "The password cannot be changed at this time" within Windows 2000
GUARD SYSTEM FILES ON WINDOWS 2000
HARD DISK FREE SPACE WARNING
Hanging Boot Process
Hibernate and Windows 2000
Hints regarding regedit and .reg files
How can I add a Encrypt/Decrypt option to the context menu?
HOW DO I PERFORM AN EMERGENCY SHUTDOWN?
How can I add a Copy to Folder option to the context menu?
HOW CAN I ENABLE USERS TO SET THE ADMINISTRATOR PASSWORD DURING AN RIS INSTALLATION?
How can I avoid having to click 'Show Files' in 2000's Explorer all the time?
How can I tell which DLL's and API calls a program makes?
How do I add a network place in Windows 2000?
HOW DO I DISPLAY NON-PLUG-AND-PLAY LEGACY DEVICES IN WINDOWS 2000?
HOW DO I ENABLE IMAGE PREVIEW FOR A FOLDER?
How do I publish a shared folder in Active Directory?
How do I set the DVD region in Windows 2000?
How do I turn off Internet Explorer AutoComplete?
How can I call a subroutine in a batch file?
How can I lock a workstation from the command line with W2000?
How can I increase the time that services have to shut down?
HTM FILE PRINTING PROBLEM
Identifying the security ID (SID) of a user
Improving System performance by spreading pagefile across multiple drives
Identifying a second processor within WIN2000
INSTALL THE HIGH-ENCRYPTION PACK FOR WIN2K
Installing multiple hotfixes with qchain
Installing SP6a after high excryption of IE 5.01
Installing the Windows 2000 Service Pack 2 support tools update
INSTANTLY LAUNCH A NEW BROWSER WINDOW
Iomega parallel port Zip drive under Windows 2000
I've increased the size of a hardware RAID volume but NT does not see the size increase, what can I do?
Keeping kernel code in memory on NT systems with more than 64MB memory
Keeping start menu open, after selecting a programm
KEYBOARD SHORTCUTS IN WINDOWS 2000
KILL HUNG PROCESSES AT SHUTDOWN
KNOW WHEN YOU'RE LOW ON DISK SPACE
LINK A SCANNER OR CAMERA TO A PROGRAM
LOCK DOWN BROWSER HOME PAGE
Locking down unused TCP and UDP ports in Windows NT
Locking floppy disk drives in Windows NT
LOCKING WIN2K WITH SYSKEY
LOCKING THE TASKBAR
LOCATING YOUR BIOS DATE AND VERSION IN WIN2K AND WINDOWS NT
MAKE YOUR CUSTOM PROFILE THE DEFAULT USER PROFILE
MAKING CHANGES TO LMHOSTS FILE
Manage the open with option
Master Browser election problems
MINIMIZE THE RISK OF USING WINDOWS 2000 PROFESSIONAL
Modifying the Active Directory's garbage-collection period
Modifying the default Telnet client terminal type
MOVE MY COMPUTER ICON FROM DESKTOP TO START MENU
Multi-tabbed dialog with 3D pie charts showing disk space usage
OPEN A COMMAND PROMPT ANYWHERE
Performing an emergency shutdown in Windows 2000
Pinging multiple computers simultaneously
Powerful shareware scheduling tool for Windows
PLACE TASK MANAGER IN YOUR SYSTEM TRAY
PUSHING AND POPING NETWORK CONNECTIONS
Preventing a user from running or stopping a scheduled process
PREVENTING CHANGES TO DRIVE MAPPINGS WITH WINDOWS NT
PREVENTING GUEST ACCESS TO EVENT LOGS
Preventing the OS from storing LAN Manager (LM) hashes in Active Directory (AD) and the SAM
Prevent Loitering: Hide the Network Neighborhood Icon
PREVENT USERS FROM ADDING OR REMOVING WINDOWS COMPONENTS
PREVENT USERS FROM CHANGING FILE TYPE ASSOCIATIONS
PRINTER SECURITY
Problems changing your password if the Global Catalog is unavailable
Protecting folder with a password in explorer
Quickly Displaying System Properties
Quick performance enhancement tip for NT server
Renaming the built-in Administrator account
Remote MAC address retrieval
Removing the icons that appear in my system tray
Removing menu choices from the shortcut menu in Windows NT Explorer
RECREATE THE MY DOCUMENTS SHORTCUT ON MY DESKTOP
REPLACE A DLL WHILE THE SYSTEM IS USING IT
Replicating log-on scripts between Windows 2000 and Windows NT 4.0 DCs
Repair broken applications with the Windows Installer
Reseting the DVD region count in Windows 2000
Resolving Network Resources
Restricting network browsing to users local workgroup/domain
Save your EFS private key
SAVING SPACE ON A SMALL HARD DISK
SAVING A FILE IN NOTEPAD
Saving your favorits to a html document
SCHEDULING A REBOOT OF YOUR SERVER
SHORTCUT FOR PDCs AND BDCs
Shortcut: scroll down - up
Sending a product's CD key during a Windows Installer installation
Setting DLL files to use their own icon rather than the standard?
SETTING PASSWORDS UNDER RIS
SPEEDING APPLICATION LAUNCHES BY ADJUSTING BINDING ORDER
Starting and stopping services remotely
Starting a program at a different priority
STOP USERS FROM CHANGING THE MY DOCUMENTS PATH
Stopping my Windows DCs from dynamically registering DNS names
STOPPING THE WINDOWS NT SHUTDOWN PROCESS
Stop Print Job Logging
Themes within Windows 2000
The Robocopy program
Troubleshooting PC hardware problems
Troubleshooting the Computer Browser service
Unable to stop a process from Task Manager even though I'm an Administrator
UNBIND NETBIOS FROM YOUR PUBLIC INTERFACE
Unsigned drivers are stopping my unattended installations
Use Automatic Caching To Make Files Available Offline
Uses of the Windows key in Windows NT
USING AN EXTERNAL MODEM WITH WINDOWS 2000 PROFESSIONAL
Using the "CoolSwitch" in Windows NT
USING MORE CHARACTERS FOR VERY LONG PATH NAMES
USING SHOWACLS AND XCACLS TO ADJUST PERMISSIONS
Viewing file associations from the Command Prompt in Windows NT
Viewing a group's members from the command line in Windows NT
VIEWING WEB PAGES THAT USE FRAMES
What are Super Hidden Files?
What does message/error/event X mean?
What is the Internet Explorer (IE) 6 unsafe-file list ?
What keys are available during startup of Windows 2000 to troubleshoot?
What logs are available to troubleshoot Windows 2000 installation problems?
When I start Explorer I get a Dr Watson error, what can I do?
When was a Web page last updated ?
WHEN I RUN THE NBTSTAT -C COMMAND, WHY DO SOME LINES HAVE A PERIOD (.) IN THE NAME COLUMN?
WHERE DID THE ODBC CONTROLS GO?
Where are the quick launch buttons on my toolbar defined ?
Where can I find .adm files for Microsoft software?
Where are the Dr Watson logs in Windows 2000?
Where can I get TweakUI for Windows 2000?
WHERE DID ADMINISTRATIVE TOOLS GO?
How can I move the ntds.dit file?
How can I move the Active Directory log files?
Who do I create a bootable Windows 2000 installation CD-ROM?
Why doesn't my computer prompt me for a password when it returns from hibernation?
Why don't I have mouse support for programs using command.com in Windows 2000?
Why doesn't Windows 2000 retain my pagefile settings?
Why do some MS-DOS applications print incomplete pages in Windows NT ?
Why is viewing Windows Me or Windows 98 shares from a Windows 2000 machine so slow?
Windows 2000 authentication protocols
WINDOWS 2000 DEFAULT SECURITY
Windows NT 4.0 RAS servers in a Windows 2000 network
YOUR WINDOWS 2000 PRINT OPERATOR CAN'T ADD A PRINTER DRIVER ON YOUR DOMAIN CONTROLLER


Troubleshooting PC hardware problems

Troubleshooting problems with PC hardware can be made easier by using two utilities provided on the Windows NT CD. The SUPPORT folder in the root of the CD contains folders for the two programs - NTHQ and SCSIHQ. The NT Hardware Qualifier (NTHQ) can be used to create a detailed summary of the hardware in your PC, the SCSI Hardware Qualifier (SCSIHQ) can be used to provide detailed information on SCSI adapters and devices in your system. For each program, insert a blank floppy disk and run the MAKEDISK.BAT utility, which can be found in the folder. Once the Makedisk program has completed, reboot the PC with the disk inserted and the program will run automatically.


When was a Web page last updated ?

Sometimes it's not easy to tell when a Web page was last updated. If the author
doesn't show you outright, you should be able to find out with a snippet of
JavaScript code. Open your JavaScript-enabled Web browser and type the following
on the Address line: javascript:alert(document.lastModified) -- hit Enter, and a
dialog box should pop up with the time & date of the last page modification.
It's a simple trick you should keep up your sleeve should the need arise.


Adding a printer to the send to context option?

To add a printer to the send to context option perform the following:
Start Explorer, move to your SendTo folder of your profile, e.g. %systemroot%\Profiles\<user>\SendTo. Open the printers folder (Start - Settings - Printers), right click on the printer and drag to the SendTo directory and select 'Create shortcut here'. Rename the shortcut to a shorter name by pressing F2. You will now be able to right click on a document and send to the printer.


INSTANTLY LAUNCH A NEW BROWSER WINDOW

As you surf the Web, there are occasions when it's convenient to have more than one Internet Explorer window open at the same time. For example, when you're investigating the results of search engine, you can leave the search results in one instance of Internet Explorer and investigate each site in a separate instance of Internet Explorer. To do this, hold down the [Shift] key as you click links on the search results page. When you do, a separate Internet Explorer window will instantly launch and connect to that site. To investigate the results faster, use the [Shift]/click technique to launch three or four separate instances of Internet Explorer. Then, while the second, third and fourth pages are loading, return to the first one, which should be done loading, and investigate the contents. You can then access the second page, and so on.


STOPPING THE WINDOWS NT SHUTDOWN PROCESS

If you've ever clicked the Shutdown button by mistake (and then had to wait for your computer to reboot), here's a cool tip. Once you've started the Shutdown process, but before you see the small window that shows the status of the Shutdown, press [Ctrl][Alt][Delete]. You'll then see the Windows NT Security dialog box. Click Logoff, and Windows NT will simply log you off rather than shutting down your server.


How can I call a subroutine in a batch file?

An easy way to do this is to have the batch file call itself recursively and pass itself a couple of parameters, like so:
@echo off
if (%1)==(Recurse) goto Recurse
goto Begin
:Begin
echo Batch file begins.
call %0 Recurse test
goto End
:Recurse
echo This is a recursive call.
echo The parameters received were "%1" and "%2".
goto Clean-End
:End
echo Finished.
:Clean-End
Be careful! Recursive batch files can be dangerous, especially if your subroutine fires off another program.


SAVING SPACE ON A SMALL HARD DISK

(contributed by H. David Dabour, dabour@att.com)
A good tip for saving space on a small C drive is to change the default TEMP variable to something other than the C drive (i.e., D:\TEMP). Just make sure it's a local drive and not a network drive.


Identifying the security ID (SID) of a user

Have you ever wondered which security ID Windows NT has assigned to a specific user? You can find out by selecting the following Registry key within Registry Editor:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\ProfileList\SID
Once you've accessed this key, observe the data in the ProfileImagePath value (in the right-hand pane). You'll see the name of the profile folder for the user associated with this SID. For example, if you have a user who's logged on to your server as Fred, you should see a ProfileImagePath of %SystemRoot%\Profiles\Fred associated with this user's SID.


Access to the registry tools has been stopped, is there any way to get access?

A. I include this as I had the exact problem on site a couple of days ago and I want Administrators to be aware that this can be done. If the scheduler service is running on your PC (or if you can start it) you can submit the registry editor to start via the scheduler and it will then be started under the system context. For example
C:\> at <1 minute in the future> /interactive regedt32.exe
One minute from submission regedt32.exe will be started giving you full access to the registry.


How can I avoid having to click 'Show Files' in 2000's Explorer all the time?

In Windows 2000 certain directories content is automatically hidden (such as the %systemroot%, system32 etc folder) to avoid the user accidentally corrupting the system. In order to see the files you have to click the 'Show Files' text. If you know what you are doing this can get annoying quickly and you can disable this as follows:
1, Start Explorer (Win + E or right click My Computer and select Explore)
2, From the Tools menu select Folder Options
3, On the View tab select 'Show hidden files and folders'. Click OK
4, Move to the %systemroot% directory (e.g. c:\winnt)
5, Click 'Show Files'
6, Rename the Desktop.ini file to something else, e.g. Desktopbak.ini
7, Repeat for any other folders such as %systemroot%\system32 and 'program files'


SHORTCUT FOR PDCs AND BDCs
(contributed by Max Mednick, max@maxmednick.com)

Try this one on your PDCs and BDCs because this shortcut is much faster than Server Managers' kludgy interface:
1) Right-click on the Desktop, and select New Shortcut.
2) In the command-line field, type Net Accounts/sync, and click Next.
3) In the Select a Name for the Shortcut field, type Sync Domain, or some such descriptor, and click Finish.
All done! Now, when changes are made to the directory database (i.e., new user or changed password), simply double-click the new icon and a quick CMD window will pop up and complete the command successfully. Your domain directory database will also start its synchronization process.If you're slick, you can put this shortcut in your Start Menu, and give it a cool icon and a keyboard shortcut.


ADJUSTING THE SCREEN SAVER PASSWORD GRACE PERIOD
If you've upgraded your Windows NT computer to Service Pack 4, you might notice that Windows NT uses a longer grace period before prompting you for a password whenever the screen saver is activated. You can change this grace period by adding a value to your computer's Registry. In Registry Editor, access HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Winlogon. Add the value ScreenSaverGracePeriod with a data type of REG_SZ. In the Data Type text box, type the number of seconds for which you want to set the grace period. By default, Service Pack 4 sets the grace period to five seconds. You can set it to a number from 0 to 2,147,483 seconds.


Changing the graphic displayed behind the Logon dialog box

By default, Windows NT displays its logo (either Windows NT Server or Windows NT Workstation) behind the Logon dialog box. You can change this graphic by editing the Registry. You might want to change this graphic if you want to have Windows NT display your company's logo instead of the default logo.
To change the graphic, begin by starting Registry Editor. Access the key \HKEY_USERS\.DEFAULT\Control Panel\Desktop. In the right-hand pane, double-click on the Wallpaper value. By default, Microsoft displays the data in the Wallpaper value as (Default) which tells your computer to display the Windows NT logo. To change this value, type in the path and name of the bitmap file you want to display instead. For example, to display a file named "logo.bmp" that you've stored in the c:\winnt folder, you would type c:\winnt\logo.bmp. (Note: Whatever graphic you want to use will need to be in the bitmap format.)


Keeping start menu open, after selecting a programm

When you hold down the SHIFT key while left-clicking on an icon in the Start Menu, the group will remain open so that you can select other icons without having to navigate back through the Start Menu again." This tip may only be applicable to IE4/5 users out there, but it's worth trying! Save yourself some mousing miles.


I've increased the size of a hardware RAID volume but NT does not see the size increase, what can I do?

You need to reset the Disk Administrator configuration by performing the following:
Backup your disk configuration by starting disk administrator (Start - Programs - Administrative Tools - Disk Administrator or just run WINDISK.EXE)
Insert a floppy disk and from the Partition menu select Configuration - Save. You configuration will then be saved to the disk
Close the Disk Administrator
Start the registry editor (regedit.exe)
Move to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\DISK
Select the Disk key and press DEL.
Close the registry editor
Restart the Disk Administrator
It will say its the first time Disk Administrator has been run and it will update the disk configuration


How can I tell which DLL's and API calls a program makes?

The Windows NT/2000 resource kit supplies a utility called APIMON which can be used to monitor all DLL and API calls made. To use perform the following:
Start APIMON (Start - Run - APIMON.EXE)
From the File menu select Open
Select the image you want to monitor and click OK (I'm using %systemroot%\system32\notepad.exe)
Two blank windows, 'DLL's in use' and 'Api Counters'
The next task is to start the selected image. Click the green Play arrow (or select 'Start Monitor' from the tools menu)
The application will start and the two blank windows will now have DLL and API information.
When complete click Stop or select 'Stop Monitor' from the tools menu
Stopping the API Monitor program will also stop the image it had loaded so make sure you don't lose any work :-)


PREVENTING CHANGES TO DRIVE MAPPINGS WITH WINDOWS NT

Have you ever wanted to prevent users from changing their drive mappings? If so, you can prevent Windows NT users from mapping new drives or disconnecting their existing drives by modifying the Registry.
Begin by accessing the Registry key HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\ CurrentVersion\Policies\Explorer.
Next, add the value NoNetConnectDisconnect with a data type of REG_DWORD and a value of 1. This value removes the Map Network Drive and Disconnect Network Drive from the menu in Windows NT Explorer and from the shortcut menu displayed when users right-click on the Network Neighborhood icon.
(Note: Your users must be using Windows NT with Service Pack 2 or later to support this setting.)


WHERE DID ADMINISTRATIVE TOOLS GO?

Once you have installed Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional, you may be in for a surprise if you try to run any of the programs from the Administrative Tools menu, such as Event Viewer or Performance Monitor. By default, Windows 2000 Professional doesn't display the Administrative Tools choice from the Programs menu. Here's how you fix it.
Right-click on your Taskbar and select Properties. When the Taskbar Properties screen appears, click the Start Menu options tab. At the bottom of the screen, you'll see the Start Menu Settings pane. Select the Display Administrative Tools checkbox. Then, click Apply and OK. You should find Administrative Tools under Programs after you click the Start button


USING SHOWACLS AND XCACLS TO ADJUST PERMISSIONS
(contributed by Mark Joseph Edwards, http://www.ntsecurity.net)

Many people enjoy working from the command line, as opposed to using the standard Windows-based management GUIs. If you're in that crowd, then you already know Windows NT doesn't ship with many command line utilities--instead, Microsoft offers command line tools (as well as additional GUI-based tools) in the Microsoft Windows NT Server 4.0 Resource Kit.
One command-line tool from the Resource Kit I find very useful is showacls.exe. The tool will display the current permission settings (Access Control List--ACL) for a given directory directly from within a DOS command window. In many cases, I find using SHOWACLS to be much quicker than firing up Explorer to inspect permissions.And, in cases where you need to adjust ACLs, you can use the xcacls.exe tool, also found within the Resource Kit. XCACLS gives you all the power of Explorer's permission controls, but again, from within a DOS command window.


CREATE RIGHT-CLICK OPTION TO OPEN COMMAND PROMPT WINDOW
(contributed by Marty Hill, marty_hill@hk.ml.com)

If you're from the old school and still use the command prompt regularly, then this tip is for you. You can create a new right-click option to open a command prompt window from the directory you're currently working in. Open your Registry using RegEdit (not RegEdit32), and find the key HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Directory\shell. Create a new sub key called "CommandPrompt" as in HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Directory\shell\CommandPrompt. Change the value of default within the key to equal the text you would like on the right-click menu, for example 'Open Command Prompt....' Create another new subkey under the key you just created, and name this subkey "command" as in HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Directory\shell\CommandPrompt\command. Change the value of default within this key depending on your OS to equal either:
Windows 9x - command.com /k cd "%1" or
Windows NT - cmd.exe /k cd "%1"
Now right-click a folder, and the new option of "Open Command Prompt..." should be available.


Changing the system date and time on a remote server

If you need to change a server's date and/or time, you can use the Windows NT command net time to change the server's clock. However, you must run this command on the computer for which you want to set the date and time. If you manage remote servers (particularly servers across a wide area network), this might not always be possible. What you can do is to create a batch file with the following commands:
@echo off
net time \\computer /set /y
(Use the /y parameter to answer yes to the prompt to make sure you want to change the computer's time.) Put this batch file on the remote server in the C:\WINNT folder. Start the Schedule service on both your computer and the remote server (you can start a service on a remote computer through Server Manager), then schedule the batch file to run by using the following AT command:
at \\remote_server 12:30 /interactive c:\winnt\batch_file
Replace remote_server with the name of the server; replace 12:30 with the time you want to run the batch file; and replace batch_file with the name you assigned to your batch file.


How do I turn off Internet Explorer AutoComplete?

Internet Explorer has the neat ability to auto complete a URL as you type it. This can however be annoying and you may want to turn this off. It can be accomplished by performing the following:
1, Start Internet Explorer
2, From the Tools menu select 'Internet Options'
3, Select the Content tab
4, Click 'AutoComplete' under the 'Personal Information' section
5, Unselect 'Web addresses' and click OK
6, Click OK to the main dialog
You can also accomplish this by setting HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\AutoComplete\AutoSuggest to "no" (don't type the quotes) in the registry.


Setting DLL files to use their own icon rather than the standard?

Windows displays DLL files in Explorer with a generic DLL icon. This generic icon conveys no information about the DLL file, other than the fact that the file is a DLL.
Many DLL files have one or more icons and its possible to have one displayed in Explorer.
1, Start the registry editor (regedit)
2, Move to HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\dllfile\DefaultIcon
3, Double click (Default) and change from %SystemRoot%\System32\shell32.dll,-154 TO %1
4, Click OK
5, Close the registry editor


DISABLING THE BRIEFCASE ICON

You can use two methods to remove the Briefcase icon from a Windows NT desktop: exclude it during the original installation or disable it after building the system. Microsoft Support Online article Q163481 (http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/Q163/4/81.asp) describes how to disable the Briefcase permanently during an initial NT install. You need to edit the line that contains syncap.exe in the layout.inf and txtsetup.sif files before starting the installation, but the article cautions that this technique works only if you perform the install from a network drive or via an unattended installation. If you install NT without disabling the Briefcase, you can modify the Registry to disable the fuction that automatically creates the icon each time a new user logs on. Find your way to the Winlogon Registry entry
HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Winlogon and add the value entry RunSyncApp:REG_DWORD:0. Then, rename the %systemroot%\system32\syncapp.exe file to syncapp.old. If the RunSyncApp Registry entry disables the executable, I'm not sure why you need to rename the file, but that's Microsoft's recommended method. Remember, you can interactively modify the Registry with the Registry editor, you can include the edit in a logon script, and you can incorporate the modification in your custom system policy.


MAKING CHANGES TO LMHOSTS FILE
(contributed by Jason DePaul, j_depaul@hotmail.com)

When you update or change your LMHOSTS file, the changes will not take effect until you do one of two things. The obvious answer is to reboot, but a better answer is to type NBTSTAT -R from the command line. This approach will reload your local name cache table. The switch for -R is case sensitive.


Use Automatic Caching To Make Files Available Offline
Submitted by the Windows 2000 Development Team

When configuring shared folders on Windows 2000 Server, you can ensure that the shared files are available for users even when they are disconnected from the network. On computers running Windows 2000, caching is allowed and, by default, configured for Manual Caching for Documents for shared folders. This allows users to manually specify any files they want available when working offline. To ensure that files a user opens or creates are automatically downloaded and made available offline, change the Caching setting for the shared folder to Automatic Caching for Documents. If you want the files in a shared folder to be downloaded automatically, but also want to prevent changes the user makes offline from being synchronized, use the Automatic Caching for Programs setting instead. To change the Caching Settings for a shared folder:
Right-click the shared folder. On the Sharing tab, click Caching. In the Caching Settings dialog box, click the down arrow next to the Setting box. In the list, click the caching setting you want.
Click OK to return to the Properties dialog box for the folder, then click OK to apply your changes.


SAVING A FILE IN NOTEPAD
To save a file in Notepad without the .txt extension, put the file name in double quotes (e.g. "computer.bat"). This will save the file without the .txt extension.


What keys are available during startup of Windows 2000 to troubleshoot?

Windows 2000 inherits some of the Windows 98 features including the ability to press F8 to bring up a menu allowing various "safe" startup options.
Safe Mode
Safe Mode with Networking
Safe Mode with Command Prompt
Enable boot logging
Enable VGA mode
Enable Last Known Good configuration
Directory Services Restore Mode
Debugging Mode
Boot Normally
There are other startup keys available, some of which are not documented:
F5 - If during installation at the "Setup is inspecting your computer" the system hangs press F5 and a list of PC types will be listed. Select "Standard PC" which should resolve your problem
F6 - Displayed early in setup and allows 3rd party drivers to be loaded
F7 - Load the normal PC HAL instead of the ACPI HAL
F8 - As shown above
<Shift - F10> - Open command prompt during GUI phase of installation


What logs are available to troubleshoot Windows 2000 installation problems?

Below are a list of useful log files:
winnt32.log/winnt.log - Created during installation
setuplog.txt - Text mode logging of installation
setuperr.log - Log of errors during installation
setupact.log - GUI mode logging of setup
bootlog.txt - Drivers loaded during setup
ntbtlog.txt - Boot logging from Safe Mode option


What are Super Hidden Files?

Windows 2000 introduces Super Hidden Files which as the name implies files which are hidden from the user even more than normal hidden files. If you example you enable the ability to view hidden files and folders in Explorer these super hidden files/folders will still not be displayed. This super hidden file status is for folders like the cmdcons folder which is used for the Emergency Recover console. Super hidden files/folders can be viewed from the command line as a normal file, you don't even need the /ah dir switch (/ah sets the mode to attribute hidden).
If you wish to view via the GUI, such as Explorer.exe, perform the following:
1, Start Explorer
2, From the Tools menu select 'Folder Options'
3, Select the 'View' tab
4, Unselect the 'Hide protected operating system files (Recommended)' box
5, Click Apply then OK
The super hidden files will now be visible in Explorer. This can also be done by directly editing the registry
1, Start the registry editor (regedit.exe)
2, Move to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\policies\Explorer
3, If the value does not exist create a value named ShowSuperHidden of type DWORD
4, Set to 1. Click OK
5, Close the registry editor


DR. WATSON AND THE PRINT SPOOLER

The Spooler service might die when you have a bad print monitor utility or a corrupted spool file. If you experience this problem on your system, Dr. Watson will pop up when you try to start the Spooler service with a message that spoolss.exe failed with an access violation. Microsoft Support Online article Q242054 (http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/Q242/0/54.asp) outlines a four-step procedure you can use to restore normal print operation. The article recommends you check to see whether the printer is working after you perform each action, stopping when normal print operation resumes. First, verify that the Spooler service logs on with the System account (via the Services applet in the Control Panel). Second, delete all spool files in the print spooler directory. By default, printer spool files (files with an extension of .spl) are located in the %SystemRoot%\System32\Spool\Printers folder. When you delete a spool file, you delete all print jobs queued for printing--a major corrective action, considering that you might have hundreds of print jobs waiting, but you can't remove a printer if jobs are in the queue. Third, manually remove references to the offending printer from the Registry and reinstall the printer. Fourth, manually remove any print monitor references from the Registry. This troubleshooting procedure is too long to reproduce here, so be sure to read the article for the cautions and related Registry path names.


Changing CursorBlinkRate

They say that blinking is a sign of nervousness or lying, but I wonder if the researchers were blinking when they discovered that? You can speed up or slow down the rate at which your cursor blinks. Launch the Registry Editor (REGEDIT), and navigate to HKEY_CURRENT_USER > Control Panel > Desktop, then in the right-most panel, you should see a String Value named 'CursorBlinkRate' (if one doesn't exist, you can create one). Now, you can change the value to any number between 0 and 65535. The smaller the number, the faster your cursor will blink (and vice versa). You can also tweak the rate via the Keyboard applet in the Control Panel, but the range is severely limited.